Renewable energy in Ireland grew 15% in last 4 years

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Renewable energy in Ireland grew by an average of 15% per annum from 2005 to 2009 driven largely by a significant growth in wind energy of 28% per annum in that period, according to SEAI's latest Energy in Ireland report. Last year also witnessed a steady trend towards lower energy prices in Ireland for both domestic and business energy users.
Renewable energy in Ireland grew by an average of 15% per annum from 2005 to 2009 driven largely by a significant growth in wind energy of 28% per annum in that period, according to SEAI's latest Energy in Ireland report. Last year also witnessed a steady trend towards lower energy prices in Ireland for both domestic and business energy users.

The Energy in Ireland report also shows a significant decline in energy-related CO2 emissions in 2009 of 11%.

Meanwhile, 80% of new cars purchased in 2010 (Jan to Nov) were in the most energy efficient A and B label bands, up from 25% in July 2008, prior to the introduction of  new motor tax bands.

Overall energy use declined by 9% in 2009, with sectors such as industry at 13%, services at 12% and transport at 10% witnessing the greatest fall.
Energy minister Eamon Ryan praised the growth in renewable energy and drive towards energy efficiency, but a significant chunk of the decline in energy use is likely to have been caused by the economic decline.

Launching the report, Minister Ryan said: “I am encouraged by the findings of the latest Energy in Ireland report, particularly to see renewable energy grow at a time when energy prices are falling for both business and domestic consumers. Contrary to some perceptions, Ireland’s position in terms of energy prices relative to the rest of Europe continues to improve, with prices for many consumers now below the EU average.”

The full report is available at the bottom of this page.

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