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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Lectros/Electo-Osmosis - am I getting ripped off?

    Hi guys,

    First time poster, advice appreciated. I have a 1930s cottage which has been fully refurbished. Unfortunately, a rising damp problem that we thought was confined to one room and which we thought could be dealt with is spreading to all the bedrooms.

    Long story short, I'm looking at lectros/electro osmosis to solve the problem, had a guy down to survey the place and (well, what a shock) he agreed that it would be just the job. I'm planning on getting the system installed from the outside in, as I don't want to be ripping the place apart inside as it's just finished.

    Anyway, the website says it's €35 per linear metre. I'm not precisely sure how far all round my house is but know for a fact it is less than 50 metres. So I thought I was looking at a price of around €1800 before VAT. Today I get a quote for €3,500

    Phoning the guy, he claims it's because he will need to use 70 metres of the titanium for the house as the walls are thick and a it has to be inserted at various points and a metre won't stretch a full metre. He also says there's extra because it is outside and there's extra work with the plaster, etc.

    Has anyone else has this done or do this work, and do his excuses/claims ring through? I got him down to €2800 cash but I'm still not happy with it. Am I being ripped off or just paranoid? Another company I contacted today quoted €2,000 but I don't know their work and I do know this guy's.

    Cheers
    J

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22

    Default

    2,800 is still expensive. But of course that's because you're contracting out the whole job including making good and this would be considered as specialist job.

    It's essentially a DIY job really and you can get the electrode and wire over the net. One good option to check, is to pump a silicone creme into the walls. This would be as effective as the wire and is also a DIY job. Of the two, my research on the topic would lean me to the silicone creme (Dryzone is a brand name with BBA approval and can be bought in ireland).

    Doing it DIY should see you spend no more than 1100 euros.

    However before you settle on either of the above, check the ground levels out side the house and reduce it to 6 inches below the inside floor level. Look for tress that are near the house as roots from these will be drawing water up to the foundations. These may need to be removed. Also you could put in a french drain around the outside of the house to drain away any moisture from the foundations. Doing these would go a long way to solving your damp problem without too much cost, especially if you do the work yourself.

  3. #3

    Default lectros

    not difficult to install why dont you go to
    www.twistfix.ie
    you can buy a lectros kit from here and do yourself
    easy to install i have done a few over the years

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    207

    Default step by step approach

    I would not proceed to spend a dime on all/any immediate treatment of whatever kind.

    Determining the root cause of your moisture problems is priority No.1 and if this is a family home and given the extent of infiltration you might want to consult local health authority's.

    There's no magic wand in the construction business so don't get taken for a ride.

    Ask around and see if you can find a reliable pro with moisture meter and infra red camera and then accompany that person in a top to bottom inspection of your family home.

    Once the root cause has been determined then you can look to hire a licensed and bonded / certified construction contractor ~ nothing less will do, your family is at risk in the conditions as described and a wizard with a wand in hand is hocus pocus.

    pete
    Last edited by etep; 11th November 2012 at 03:50 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Sligo
    Age
    6
    Posts
    180

    Default

    I´d be extremely carefull.
    First of all you have to find the cause of the damp wall.
    It is not necessarily rising damp (even so that would be the most common cause)
    It could be caused by condensation, lack of ventilation, usage of wrong materials and the increase of salt in your walls.
    It also depends on your water table, location of your house etc.
    Electro osmosis is the most discussed/doubted option solving this prob in Germany and rather not recommended.
    Doing some generell research on it, I found that you might get an improvement but there is no guarantee and in other cases it had zero effect.
    You should also be aware that whatever measures you take it might take years before your walls fully dry out, don´t expect an immediate improvement.
    My advice would always be an constructive approach.
    Minimum is a well designed french drain but it could be pushed as far as sawing around the perimeter of your house to install a dpc.
    Assessment is key in any case.
    If your ground water table is to high, you´ve almost have no chance, etc.
    Damp foundations / walls are a mine field and I don´t dare to recommend a definit solution.
    It´s a job for the highly highly specialised specialist (yes, I repeat that by intention!) who could be hard to find.
    I don´t know whether you get ripped of or not, but how about you ask for a written guarantee? For re-work and or refund/compensation if the system fails?
    If the company backs out / can´t answer those questions I would be at least alarmed.
    Tricky one in any case
    Last edited by Clíoma house; 11th November 2012 at 12:57 PM. Reason: spellling

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Sligo
    Age
    6
    Posts
    180

    Default

    Ok, I just read the 25 excuses electro osmosis installers present if the system fails.
    Means even a guarantee or refund promise does not work as they will blame anything but there system.
    Just to give you something to think:
    The same electro field/voltage (generated by the eletro osmosis system) that pushes DOWN the moisture in bricks, pushes the moisture UP in mortar due to the different properties/capillaries of the materials.
    Somebody who can explain to me how to controll these phenomenens?
    It is also said:
    "Due to the controversities and uncertaintanties using electro osmosis, no decent engineer will advise the use of it until all uncertanties are ruled out"(very free translationof a comment on electro osmosis)

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